Hair loss: Sugar may damage your hair – how much can you have?

Hair loss: Sugar may damage your hair – how much can you have?

Gemma Atkinson reveals her hair loss

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A GP should be able to tell you what’s causing your hair loss by looking at your hair. For older women, hormonal changes that are linked with menopause also contribute to hair loss. Our diet can also play a big role in our hair health, and there are certain foods it is recommended that we limit.

A study published in the National Library of Medicine says carbohydrates also influence the state of hair.

It states: “It has been shown that consumption of highly processed foods, rich in simple sugars, is one of the indirect factors causing excess hair loss. Diet rich in simple sugars stimulates sebum secretion by sebaceous glands.”

Indeed, Pantene site says: “Sugar causes you to have poor blood circulation. Once your circulation is affected, it becomes difficult for your blood to reach all the way up to your hair follicles.

“Another problem that arises is that the nutrients that circulate in your blood, which means that the nutrients don’t reach the hair follicles properly.”

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It adds: “Some people, due to excess sugar intake, also experience what is known as ‘scalp inflammation’. As opposed to the burning sensation, scalp inflammation leads to you having a very cold scalp caused due to poor blood circulation. This, again, leads to damaged hair.”

The NHS says: “Eating too much sugar can make you gain weight and can also cause tooth decay.”

It states: “Eating too much sugar can contribute to people having too many calories, which can lead to weight gain.

“Being overweight increases your risk of health problems such as heart disease, some cancers and type 2 diabetes.”

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The NHS says Britons eat too much sugar, about 700g a week. The NHS says that is an average of 140 teaspoons per person.

The health body says: “Added sugars, such as table sugar, honey and syrups, shouldn’t make up more than five percent of the energy you get from food and drink each day. That’s about 30g a day for anyone aged 11 and older.”

Generally, hair loss is not usually anything to be worried about, and can happen to both men and women.

Though occasionally it can be a sign of a medical condition, so if you experience sudden hair loss or you begin to develop bald patches, the NHS recommends that you consult your doctor.

The NHS says Britons eat too much sugar, about 700g a week. The NHS says that is an average of 140 teaspoons per person.

The health body says: “Added sugars, such as table sugar, honey and syrups, shouldn’t make up more than 5 percent of the energy you get from food and drink each day. That’s about 30g a day for anyone aged 11 and older.”

Generally, hair loss is not usually anything to be worried about, and can happen to both men and women.

Though occasionally it can be a sign of a medical condition, so if you experience sudden hair loss or you begin to develop bald patches, the NHS recommends that you consult your doctor.

“The GP should be able to tell you what’s causing your hair loss by looking at your hair. Tell them if your hair loss is affecting your well being, and ask what treatments are available,” the health body adds.

Hair loss, known medically as alopecia, is fairly common. It’s estimated, for instance, that around 40 percent of women aged 70 years or over experience female-pattern baldness.

Finasteride and minoxidil are the main treatments for male pattern baldness. Minoxidil can also be used to treat female pattern baldness. Women should not use finasteride.

The Cleveland Clinic says: “It is important to note that premenopausal women should not take medications for hair loss treatment without using contraception. Many drugs, including minoxidil and finasteride, are not safe for pregnant women or women who want to get pregnant.”

Other hair loss treatments include steroid injections and creams, as well as immunotherapy. Some people also choose to have hair transplants, which is when hair is removed from the back of the head and moved to thinning patches.

Some wigs are available on the NHS, but you may have to pay unless you qualify for financial help.

If your hair loss is causing you distress, your GP may be able to help you get some counselling.

As we grow older, there is a tendency for our hair fibres to become finer and shorter and we may experience hair loss or greying.

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