High cholesterol: One of the best vegetables to lower cholesterol – expert dietitian

High cholesterol: One of the best vegetables to lower cholesterol – expert dietitian

Dr Chris reveals how eyes can indicate high cholesterol levels

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Cholesterol can be divided into two subtypes, HDL and LDL.

HDL is also known as “good” cholesterol; this keeps the heart healthy.

LDL meanwhile is referred to as “bad” cholesterol; it forms as a plaque in the arteries raising blood pressure.

A balanced diet is one of the most effective ways to keep HDL high and LDL

According to dietitian Lisa Young, one particular vegetable is more effective than others at keeping cholesterol levels at their optimum.

Young recommends a healthy dosage of carrots.

On the popular orange vegetable, Young said: “Carrots are a good source of soluble fibre, which can help reduce cholesterol levels.

“They are also rich beta carotene, the vitamin A antioxidant that can protect you from chronic disease like heart disease.”

Heart disease is one of the biggest killers in the UK.

On average, one person dies every three minutes from a form of cardiovascular disease according to the British Heart Foundation.

This is a situation unlikely to be improved after two years of working from home.

According to some health experts, working from home could have had an “unfortunate consequence” on longevity.

Health provider Bupa says more people are exercising less and eating more.

The combination of these factors has meant thousands face an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Furthermore, data suggests around half of people have not seen their GP within the past year.

This means cases of heart disease are not necessarily being picked up.

In a statement, Bupa’s Dr Robin Clark said: “Lockdowns, gym closures, and general uncertainty made it difficult for many to prioritise their health during the pandemic.

“Despite restrictions ending, it looks like, as a nation, we’re still struggling to stay active and eat well with the unfortunate consequence it may take years for our health to return to pre-pandemic levels.”

Bupa’s report comes amid concern from experts the UK is falling behind compared to other nations with regards to overall physical health.

Professor Tracey Devonport said the UK “reported the lowest levels of perceived physical health and greatest weight gain during the pandemic”.

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